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Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

Review Of Personal Shopper (2016)

The Personal Shopper is an upcoming movie directed by Olivier Assayas. He is a writer and director, known for Paris, je t’aime (2006), Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) and Personal Shopper (2016). The film stars  Kristen Stewart, Lars Eidinger, Sigrid Bouaziz and more.

Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

The film starts with a young American in Paris works as a personal shopper for a celebrity. She seems to have the ability to communicate with spirits, like her recently deceased twin brother. Soon, she starts to receive ambiguous messages from an unknown source.

Lars Eidinger in Personal Shopper (2016)

Lars Eidinger in Personal Shopper (2016)

In the opening scene, Maureen arrives at a big empty mansion to hold a séance, and though she doesn’t spot the menacing specter hovering in the corner of the living room, Assayas ensures that we do. It will take some time before the movie gets around to revealing what Maureen was doing in that house — although it never bothers to explain what she, an American, is doing in Paris. Turns out, her twin brother, Lewis, also lived in France. Actually, it would be more accurate to say he died in France, which hasn’t been an easy thing for Maureen to accept. They both had weak hearts, and the deal was, whoever died first would send the other a sign from the other side, so she — and we — spend the movie waiting for just such a message. And because Assayas has already indicated that ghosts are not only real but potentially malevolent, that creates real suspense.

Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

Kristen Stewart in Personal Shopper (2016)

The message arrives, as messages tend to do, via cell phone during an already harried go-fer run to London. Considering that Maureen will spend the better part of 20 minutes texting with an unknown (and potentially undead) caller, it’s kind of a clever conceit that she spends the conversation juggling her most glamorous assignment. But it’s also a bummer that Stewart has to act so much of the movie on her lonesome, avoiding calls from her long-distance boyfriend and doing research via YouTube (where she watches videos about abstract painter Hilma of Klimt and French novelist Victor Hugo, who both communed with the beyond). Stewart is a terrific actress, her brittle exterior barely masking whatever tempest she or her characters are battling underneath, and here, the unpredictability of what she may do next is heightened by the fact that there are no rules for what can happen.

Soon, Maureen is taking orders from the mysterious presence on the other end of her cell phone, who starts to feed her lines not that far from those of the postmodern serial killer in “Scream.” (Yes, she likes scary movies.) Whoever it leaves a key for her to a hotel room, encouraging Maureen to test her phobias, which evidently involve trying on Kyra’s clothes and then masturbating in her boss’s bed. Maureen not-so-secretly despises her boss, though her feelings on this — like those involving her dead brother, or toward the fashion industry in which she’s made so many high-ranking connections — are only partly articulated.

Though the film is told in strictly chronological order, making sense of it feels like trying to reassemble a broken mirror. Losing Lewis really messed up Maureen, and in her meaningless job as a celebrity slave, she’s starting to lose herself as well. She could quit, though Assayas comes up with a far more surprising way to liberate Maureen of her employment duties, whisking her away to faraway Oman, for a scene that’s as disembodied from the rest of the film as the Iraq-set opening of “The Exorcist” feels from all the reality-grounded horror that follows. (Stewart’s first of two topless scenes, in which she goes in for a heart sonogram, could be a nod to the far grimmer carotid angiography Regan endures in that film.) Between this and “Sils Maria,” Stewart has suffered enough for imaginary stars, we can only hope she goes easy on her own assistants.

Trailer of Personal Shopper (2016)

Critic Response of Personal Shopper:

According to Rottentomatoes, The film got 65% rating and the average rating of the personal shopper is 6.5 out of 10, which is based on 52 reviews and According to another website MetacriticThe film Personal Shopper got 68% on the based on 13 Reviews.

The film Personal Shopper schedule to be Released on March 10, 2017.